Category Archives: Credit Valley Conservation

FLOOD WATCH – Message #1

Issued 2:30pm Friday, April 13th

Credit Valley Conservation advises that 2-5 mm of precipitation has fallen throughout the watershed since Thursday with an additional 80-100 mm of precipitation expect over the next five days in the form of rain or freezing rain.

Water levels along the Credit River and its major tributaries have increased due to the rain and will continue to rise.  Some minor flooding in low lying areas is anticipated.  These areas may include Townline Road in Orangeville, Inglewood, Terra Cotta, Crestview Lake and Caledon Lake in Caledon.

The public is reminded to exercise extreme caution around all water bodies.  Banks adjacent to rivers and creeks are very slippery at this time and when combined with current weather conditions, pose a serious hazard.  People are encouraged to keep their children and pets away from all watercourses and off frozen water bodies, which will be extremely unsafe.

CVC will continue to monitor the watercourse and the weather.  This Flood Watch will be updated by 2pm Monday April 16, 2018.

For more information on this Flood Watch message, contact CVC during office hours at 905- 670-1615.  To report a flood afterhours, please call 1-800-215-8505.

To view current watershed conditions, visit our real-time monitoring website:  http://www.creditvalleyca.ca/watershed-science/watershed-monitoring/real-time-monitoring/

Spring Safety Message: Exercise Caution Around Waterways

Credit Valley Conservation (CVC) is reminding residents of the dangers that exist on and near local streams, rivers, ponds and lakes, particularly around this time of year. CVC urges people to exercise caution and keep family members and pets away from the edges of all waterways.

Spring is quickly approaching and we look forward to warmer weather and being outdoors. Warmer weather usually brings more snowmelt, rain and ice breaking up along streams, rivers, ponds and lakes. During this time of year we can expect higher, faster flowing water in most watercourses. In addition, slippery and unstable stream banks and extremely cold water temperatures can lead to very hazardous conditions close to any water body.

Continue reading Spring Safety Message: Exercise Caution Around Waterways

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Conservation Gala Receives Record Support

May 24, 2017 – Credit Valley Conservation Foundation (CVCF) hosted its 12th Annual Conservation Gala on Thursday, May 4. The final count shows a record level of support from the local community. Over 375 guests raised $237,000 in the spirit of the next 150 years of conservation in the Credit River watershed.

Funds raised support CVCF’s five-year Protect, Connect and Sustain Campaign. The campaign goal is to raise $5 million for Credit Valley Conservation (CVC) by 2020 to support three key projects: Conservation Youth Corps, land securement and the Credit Valley Trail.

“We are grateful for the tremendous support the gala received from our friends and partners in the community,” said Terri LeRoux, Executive Director, CVCF. “Nature is essential to healthy communities and individual well-being, so we want to do everything we can to protect it.”

“Through our five-year campaign, we continue to raise funds that support the important environmental work CVC does to protect, connect and sustain us,” continued LeRoux. “Funds will be invested in securing new conservation lands, inspiring youth to be future environmental champions and building the Credit Valley Trail to connect the Lake Ontario waterfront to the headwaters of the Credit River in Orangeville.”

Since 2006, the Conservation Gala has raised over $1.6 million in support of CVC projects and initiatives that enhance the local environment for present and future generations. Every year the gala is attended by corporate leaders, individual philanthropists, community stakeholders and municipal representatives.

This year’s event, held at Lionhead Golf Club and Conference Centre in Brampton, included a special welcome address by Carolyn King, the former chief of the Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation, a Birds of Prey display where participants could meet native wildlife, and a substantial silent and live auction featuring over 125 items and experiences.

The Conservation Gala was a success due to the generous support of corporate sponsors, including:

Dinner sponsor: Port Credit West Village Partners (Diamond Corp, Dream, FRAM + Slokker, and Kilmer Van Nostrand Co. Limited)

Cocktail reception sponsor: DG Group, Condrain, GEMS, and Aquatech Dewatering

Valet and photography sponsor: Argo Land Development and Urbantech Consulting

Birds of Prey sponsor: Shoreplan Engineering

About Credit Valley Conservation Foundation

Credit Valley Conservation Foundation is a registered environmental charity working to help protect and conserve the lands and waters of the Credit River Watershed. The Foundation accomplishes this by raising funds in support of the the valuable conservation projects carried out by Credit Valley Conservation that protect the health and well-being of the flora and fauna, the watershed and its inhabitants for today and tomorrow.

About Credit Valley Conservation
Credit Valley Conservation (CVC) is one of 36 conservation authorities in Ontario. Conservation authorities are provincial/municipal partnerships that manage the natural environment of a watershed, an area of land where the rain and snowmelt drain into a body of water. For more than 60 years, CVC has worked with its partners to build a thriving environment that protects, connects and sustains us. CVC is a member of Conservation Ontario.

Conservation Authorities Flood Programs Prevent Worse From Happening in Ontario

May 10, 2017 — Keeping people out of flood waters is a focus of flood management programs at Credit Valley Conservation, one of Ontario’s 36 Conservation Authorities across the province. But who likes to be regulated?

Marina Park in Port Credit – May 11th

“If Conservation Authorities didn’t prevent development in as many flood prone areas as they do, we’d be in a lot more trouble than we are today,” says Kim Gavine, General Manager of Conservation Ontario, the organization that represents Ontario’s Conservation Authorities.

“It’s a hard message to hear when the floodwaters are rising, but prevention is the first step to successful flood management. Not allowing development in flood prone and other hazardous areas has to be done.”

Ontario’s 36 Conservation Authorities play a key role in flood management where 90 percent of the population in the Province of Ontario lives.

At the foundation of this program are conservation authority floodplain maps which identify flood prone areas. Under the Conservation Authority Act, Conservation Authorities regulate development in these areas.

“It’s not their most popular job,” Gavine says, “but it’s a critical piece to protecting lives and property. Living near water is highly valued by us, but during the hot days of summer, we forget that rivers can flood and with growing climate change impacts, this is becoming more frequent.”

Conservation Authorities provide flood risk information to municipal planners and the general public to promote proper land use planning and regulation of new and existing development in order to protect lives and homes.

Conservation Authorities also maintain $2.7 billion worth of protective flood infrastructure such as dams and dykes or purchased lands located in hazardous areas. And, through their watershed management programs, they protect wetlands, forests and other natural features and systems which capture and store floodwaters.

Gavine points out that we’d be in a lot more trouble without the long history and experience of Conservation Authorities.

Conservation Authorities are responsible for monitoring and predicting flood flows and water levels within their watersheds, operating flood control structures such as dams, and disseminating flood messages to local municipalities and agencies. This information is used to support flood forecast, safety and warning messages to the public and many partners including emergency management officials to help keep people out of harm’s way in advance of potential flood events.

“When you look at the country as a whole, federal reports have shown that Ontario comes out on top in terms of how we prevent and reduce flooding and this is because back in the 1940s, the Province and municipalities had the foresight to start to establish Conservation Authorities across much of Ontario,” she said.

But provincial funding for conservation authority flood programs has not kept pace with changing conditions. Today, the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry provides $7.4 million per year to be shared by all 36 Conservation Authorities for flood operations.

Some of the floodplain mapping needs to be updated, flood operations within Conservation Authorities need expansion and despite some significant ongoing provincial and municipal investments in priority flood infrastructure, there is still a long list that needs to be addressed, particularly in more rural areas.

“We’ve been selling a Flood Business Case to the Province which promotes a very cost effective approach to being able to continue to reduce the escalating costs of flood damages which we’re having to pay for today,” Gavine says. “We’re lucky – we’re not starting from scratch. They can just build off the good work of Conservation Authorities.”

 

Infographic:  Risk to Resiliency – Building Resilient Watersheds to Prevent Flooding