Category Archives: Ratepayers

Budget Committee Update: Fees and Charges By-law

The City of Mississauga’s Budget Committee considered new and increased fees and charges for 2020 related to: Transit Fares; Fire and Emergency Services; Planning; Library; Culture programs and rental rates; Transportation and Works; Recreation programs and rental rates; Parks, Forestry and Environment and General Fees and Charges. These revenue sources will help offset the cost of delivering these services.

A number of proposed changes are highlighted in the Budget Committee Reports including:

  • MiWay Cash Fare (Single Adult) revised to encourage Presto migration from $3.75 to $4.00 representing an increase of $0.25 or 6.7 per cent. The Presto fare remains at $3.10. 
  • Fire: Fees charged for motor vehicle collisions and other specialty calls based on the Ministry of Transportation (MTO) fee schedule. The MTO raised their billable rates by 2.5 per cent. Fees for those incidents have been adjusted to reflect the increase.
  • Animal Services: Dog/Puppy & Cat/Kitten Adoption Fee is moving to a flat fees of $243.25 dog / puppy adoption, $165.25 kitten adoption (0-3 years) and $81 cat adoption (3-7 years)  to simplify the process.

Additional revenue of approximately $1.8 million is expected from the increases and new fees as outlined in the Oct 2, 2019 Budget Committee reports. These will alleviate some pressures on the property tax rate in 2020.

The proposed fees and charges will be presented at a Council meeting for approval on October 9, 2019.

All Budget Committee and Council meetings are open to the public. The next Budget Committee meeting is scheduled for Monday, November 18, 2019. The full schedule of meetings is available online at Council and Committees Calendar Listings.

Become familiar with the City’s 2020 Budget and Business Plan

Look through the City’s preliminary 2020 Budget and Business Plan and understand why these documents play an important role in shaping our city. Residents can learn more by:

•           Visiting mississauga.ca/budget and see what you get for your tax dollars 

•           Reading an overview of the 2020 preliminary Business Plan & Budget that was presented to the Budget Committee on June 26, 2019

•           Watching for the full 2020 proposed Budget and Business Plan (posted online on November 11)

•           Watching or attending Budget Committee deliberations scheduled for November 18, 19, 25, 26 and 27 (Budget Committee meeting schedules are subject to change) Similar to the   recent change to Council and General Committee meetings, Budget Committee meetings are to start at 9:30 a.m. beginning November 18, 2019.

Council Endorses Proposed Port Credit West Village Redevelopment Plan

The vision for the Port Credit West Village has moved closer to reality. At yesterday’s Planning and Development Committee, Council endorsed theproposed development of the former Imperial Oil Lands at 70 Mississauga Rd. S. and 181 Lakeshore Rd. W. The proposed redevelopment plan will go to Council for formal support on July 31.

The proposed multi-phase community includes 2,995 new residential units (townhomes, mid-rise and high-rise up to 29 storeys), retail, parkland and campus (employment, recreation and education) uses on the 72-acre property.

“I am pleased that we are moving forward with next steps to revitalize these former brownfield lands into a vibrant waterfront destination that will attract residents from Mississauga and beyond,” said Mayor Bonnie Crombie. “As an important City-building initiative, this redevelopment will drive tourism, create jobs and boost economic growth, helping put Mississauga on the international map. We will continue to work together to ensure our vision to transform the waterfront becomes a reality.”

“Working collaboratively with the residents and key stakeholders has created a vision for this dynamic addition to our waterfront. I look forward to continuing open dialogue as this development evolves and we have a waterfront for the entire City of Mississauga second to none,” said Ward 1 Councillor Stephen Dasko. 

As next steps, City Staff will attend the Local Planning Appeal Tribunal (LPAT) hearing scheduled for August 7, when a final decision will be made. If LPAT approves the matter, construction is anticipated to start in 2020.

“Over the past several years we’ve engaged extensively with the community,” said Andrew Whittemore, Commissioner, Planning and Building. “The comments received from the public and key stakeholders have helped shape the vision for this dynamic addition to our waterfront. We will continue to engage with residents and ensure we have strong land use policies that align with our goal of creating an accessible and sustainable waterfront.” 

Visit the City’s development information webpageto learn more.

Port Credit West Village is one of Mississauga’s three key redevelopment projects, together with 1 Port St. E. and the Lakeview Waterfront.

MIRANET’s (Mississauga Residents’ Association Network) Bill 108 Concerns

The Mississauga Residents’ Association Network (MIRANET) is a city-wide network of residents’ associations.  MIRANET notes that Bill 108 has received second reading in the Legislature.  The period for public comment closes on June 1, 2019.  More time should be permitted for public input when Bill 108 proposes to amend 13 statutes. WE HAVE SERIOUS CONCERNS ABOUT THE PROVINCE’S PROPOSED BILL 108.

Economists on all sides of the political debate have authored numerous studies demonstrating that “trickle down economics” is a failure. There is no evidence to support that a reduction in Development Charges (DC s) will lead to more affordable housing. There is no mechanism to ensure that these cost savings will be passed on to the home buyer. Home prices respond to supply and demand. THIS REDUCTION IN DCS  IS TANTAMOUNT TO AN INDUSTRY SUBSIDY FOR DEVELOPERS AT THE EXPENSE OF THE TAXPAYER.

Mississauga has been developing a comprehensive housing strategy in consultation with residents and stakeholder groups which will utilize inclusionary zoning.  This may be negated by the Minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing who will have the power to restrict the City’s Official Plan and override municipalities. WHO WILL BENEFIT? ONLY THE DEVELOPERS.

Municipal taxpayers must not subsidize the highly profitable development industry; we are already burdened enough by the high property taxes we pay. In a free market, Developers must be able to stand on their own two feet. The proposed changes will increase red tape and staffing requirements. The Municipality will be assuming greater financial risks due to the reduced development charge payment schedules. The Municipality must not assume the financial risk if Developers go bankrupt, are sold or move. WILL THE PROVINCE MAKE UP FOR ANY REDUCTIONS IN DC REVENUE?  

The community benefit charge could be the most significant of all the proposed changes. In the current Planning Act, “Section 37/Community Benefits” are known as bonus zoning, applying to sites that see height and density increases, beyond current zoning. The Developer contributes a portion of the land value uplift to help off-set the impact of this unexpected and increased development. This puts the amount back into the community that is receiving the extra height/density. The Bill proposes that the term “Community Benefit” include: Section 37 contributions, soft services development charges (e.g. library, recreation and parks, and other services traditionally subject to the statutory ten per cent deduction under the Development Charges Act, 1997); and payment in lieu of parkland dedication.

The legislation indicates the new “Community Benefit” will be capped at a prescribed percentage of the value of the lands, rather than a per-unit type of charge. If the cap reduces what the City can collect, there could be impacts on the tax base or service levels. MIRANET suggests the value of land bears no relationship to the projected number of residents living on that land who will require Municipal services.  A Complete Community has parks, libraries, and recreation facilities which make it a liveable community.  The Premier’s Bill 108 will deny us these benefits. WHO WANTS TO LIVE IN A CONCRETE JUNGLE?

The shortened time lines under the proposed streamlined Ontario Municipal Board (OMB) will no longer allow for meaningful public consultation and will generate much greater staffing and resource requirements for the City’s Planning Department. Municipalities are already struggling to meet the current timelines. This will cost more money. WILL THE PROVINCE COVER THESE COSTS? 

After years of public and stakeholder consultation, the Province implemented changes to the seriously flawed OMB model, introducing the Local Planning Appeal Tribunal (LPAT) that gives more power to Municipalities and residents. The Province’s new model returns power to Developers. WILL BILL 108 HAVE THE EFFECT OF TAX PAYERS PARTIALLY FUNDING DEVELOPMENTS? WE CERTAINLY HOPE NOT.

DOES BEING OPEN FOR BUSINESS MEAN TAXPAYERS ARE EXPECTED TO FOOT THE BILL? IS THIS GOVERNMENT FOR THE PEOPLE?

MIRANET

Mississauga Residents’ Association Network

Mississauga’s Proposed Parking Master Plan Now Available for Public Comment

The City of Mississauga’s proposed Parking Master Plan, “Parking Matters” is now available for public comment. 

The master plan details how community parking will evolve as the City continues to grow and transform. The plan’s content reflects the input received during extensive public and stakeholder consultation staff conducted over the past two years.

“The Parking Master Plan and Implementation Strategy looks at all aspects of parking in Mississauga,” said Andy Harvey, Director, Traffic Management and Municipal Parking. “Parkingpolicy, planning, funding and emerging technologies were studied to develop an approach to parking that is made for Mississauga.The Parking Master Plan will help improve efficiency, manage parking in the future and better align public and private parking with transportation and economic development goals across the City.” 

The master plan provides short and long-term recommendations focused on 10 themes. These include Municipal Parking Provisions and Management, Funding and Finance, Safety and Accessibility and Technology and Innovation.

Visit the Parking Matters website to provide comments. All input received by May 31 will be considered. 

The master plan will go to General Committee for approval on June 12.

Learn more about Parking Matters in Mississauga.