Category Archives: Ratepayers

MIRANET’s (Mississauga Residents’ Association Network) Bill 108 Concerns

The Mississauga Residents’ Association Network (MIRANET) is a city-wide network of residents’ associations.  MIRANET notes that Bill 108 has received second reading in the Legislature.  The period for public comment closes on June 1, 2019.  More time should be permitted for public input when Bill 108 proposes to amend 13 statutes. WE HAVE SERIOUS CONCERNS ABOUT THE PROVINCE’S PROPOSED BILL 108.

Economists on all sides of the political debate have authored numerous studies demonstrating that “trickle down economics” is a failure. There is no evidence to support that a reduction in Development Charges (DC s) will lead to more affordable housing. There is no mechanism to ensure that these cost savings will be passed on to the home buyer. Home prices respond to supply and demand. THIS REDUCTION IN DCS  IS TANTAMOUNT TO AN INDUSTRY SUBSIDY FOR DEVELOPERS AT THE EXPENSE OF THE TAXPAYER.

Mississauga has been developing a comprehensive housing strategy in consultation with residents and stakeholder groups which will utilize inclusionary zoning.  This may be negated by the Minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing who will have the power to restrict the City’s Official Plan and override municipalities. WHO WILL BENEFIT? ONLY THE DEVELOPERS.

Municipal taxpayers must not subsidize the highly profitable development industry; we are already burdened enough by the high property taxes we pay. In a free market, Developers must be able to stand on their own two feet. The proposed changes will increase red tape and staffing requirements. The Municipality will be assuming greater financial risks due to the reduced development charge payment schedules. The Municipality must not assume the financial risk if Developers go bankrupt, are sold or move. WILL THE PROVINCE MAKE UP FOR ANY REDUCTIONS IN DC REVENUE?  

The community benefit charge could be the most significant of all the proposed changes. In the current Planning Act, “Section 37/Community Benefits” are known as bonus zoning, applying to sites that see height and density increases, beyond current zoning. The Developer contributes a portion of the land value uplift to help off-set the impact of this unexpected and increased development. This puts the amount back into the community that is receiving the extra height/density. The Bill proposes that the term “Community Benefit” include: Section 37 contributions, soft services development charges (e.g. library, recreation and parks, and other services traditionally subject to the statutory ten per cent deduction under the Development Charges Act, 1997); and payment in lieu of parkland dedication.

The legislation indicates the new “Community Benefit” will be capped at a prescribed percentage of the value of the lands, rather than a per-unit type of charge. If the cap reduces what the City can collect, there could be impacts on the tax base or service levels. MIRANET suggests the value of land bears no relationship to the projected number of residents living on that land who will require Municipal services.  A Complete Community has parks, libraries, and recreation facilities which make it a liveable community.  The Premier’s Bill 108 will deny us these benefits. WHO WANTS TO LIVE IN A CONCRETE JUNGLE?

The shortened time lines under the proposed streamlined Ontario Municipal Board (OMB) will no longer allow for meaningful public consultation and will generate much greater staffing and resource requirements for the City’s Planning Department. Municipalities are already struggling to meet the current timelines. This will cost more money. WILL THE PROVINCE COVER THESE COSTS? 

After years of public and stakeholder consultation, the Province implemented changes to the seriously flawed OMB model, introducing the Local Planning Appeal Tribunal (LPAT) that gives more power to Municipalities and residents. The Province’s new model returns power to Developers. WILL BILL 108 HAVE THE EFFECT OF TAX PAYERS PARTIALLY FUNDING DEVELOPMENTS? WE CERTAINLY HOPE NOT.

DOES BEING OPEN FOR BUSINESS MEAN TAXPAYERS ARE EXPECTED TO FOOT THE BILL? IS THIS GOVERNMENT FOR THE PEOPLE?

MIRANET

Mississauga Residents’ Association Network

Mississauga’s Proposed Parking Master Plan Now Available for Public Comment

The City of Mississauga’s proposed Parking Master Plan, “Parking Matters” is now available for public comment. 

The master plan details how community parking will evolve as the City continues to grow and transform. The plan’s content reflects the input received during extensive public and stakeholder consultation staff conducted over the past two years.

“The Parking Master Plan and Implementation Strategy looks at all aspects of parking in Mississauga,” said Andy Harvey, Director, Traffic Management and Municipal Parking. “Parkingpolicy, planning, funding and emerging technologies were studied to develop an approach to parking that is made for Mississauga.The Parking Master Plan will help improve efficiency, manage parking in the future and better align public and private parking with transportation and economic development goals across the City.” 

The master plan provides short and long-term recommendations focused on 10 themes. These include Municipal Parking Provisions and Management, Funding and Finance, Safety and Accessibility and Technology and Innovation.

Visit the Parking Matters website to provide comments. All input received by May 31 will be considered. 

The master plan will go to General Committee for approval on June 12.

Learn more about Parking Matters in Mississauga.

CITY OF Mississauga Continues to Advocate for Independence

Earlier this month more than 300 residents participated in the City of Mississauga’s Resident Town Hall meeting on regional governance. The meeting featured a detailed presentation by City Manager and Chief Administrative Officer, Janice Baker on Mississauga’s position for independence, followed by moderated questions and comments from both audience members and those watching the live stream.   

For more information about Mississauga’s position on the Regional Government Review, visit mississauga.ca/regional-government-review.

BACKGROUND

On March 27, Mississauga City Council adopted a motion, approving in principle that Mississauga become independent from the Region of Peel, subsequent to the Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing’s Regional Government Review

In January 2019, the Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing announced that it had appointed two special advisors, Ken Seiling and Michael Fenn, to review regional government in Ontario. 

The goal of the review is to help ensure these municipalities are working effectively and efficiently and can continue to provide the vital services that communities depend on.  The City will be submitting its official position for independence by the May 21, 2019 deadline, established by the Government of Ontario for public consultation. The outcome of the Regional Government Review is expected later this summer.  

The Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing is inviting online public consultation until May 21, 2019. Residents are encouraged to share their thoughts on regional government reform through this channel. 

Last week, at Regional Council, all four municipalities agreed to work together to have an independent financial analysis 

Proposed 2019 Development Charges Background Study Available for Public Comment

The City of Mississauga has released its proposed2019 Development Charges (DC) Background Study for the 60-day statutory public comment period.

The background study, prepared by Hemson Consulting Ltd, is a comprehensive report that includes input received from the public and development stakeholders and presents the proposed 2019 Development Charge rates to be included in the proposed 2019 Development Charges By-law.

The proposed 2019 Development Charges By-law will be available for public comment on April 18, 2019.

“The City charges fees to property developers to help pay for the infrastructure required to support growth, and these are called Development Charges or DC’s,” said Jeff Jackson, Director, Finance and Treasurer. “Without DC’s, the City would have to rely entirely on property taxes or other revenue sources to pay for new fire stations, expanding libraries and community centres and building overpasses and other infrastructure. The funds collected through DC’s ensure the infrastructure required to support growth is paid for primarily by growth.”

In addition to the proposed 2019 Development Charges Background Study, the City is looking for public input on two related studies: the proposed2019 Transportation Background Study prepared by WSP  and the 2019 Stormwater Management Background Study prepared by KSGS Engineering Corp. 

Comments on all three 2019 Development Chargesbackground studies, as well as the proposed 2019Development Charges By-law can be sent tosusan.cunningham@mississauga.ca.

Members of the public are also invited to attend Council on May 8 at 9 a.m. to speak to the draft background studies and 2019 DC By-law. To be placed on the agenda, please complete an online request or contact the City Clerk’s Office through our Citizen Contact Centre at 3-1-1 or 905-615-4311 if outside city limits.

The proposed DC background study and By-law will go to City Council for approval in June.

Learn more about Development Charges in Mississauga.

Planning and Development Committee Meetings Move to Afternoons

EVENING SESSIONS WILL ONLY BE SCHEDULED IN SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES; MEETINGS FULFILL REQUIREMENTS FOR PUBLIC PARTICIPATION UNDER THE PLANNING ACT

Effective March 2019, the City of Mississauga’s Planning and Development Committee (PDC) meetings will move to a 1:30 p.m. start time.

If there are a high number of agenda items or a need for an evening meeting due to a specific application, an additional 6:30 p.m. session will be added. However, this will only be in special circumstances.  

Participation by residents, Resident and Ratepayers Associations and their members is an important part of the planning and development process. As such, there are many ways for residents to provide feedback and stay informed: 

·        Submit your comments in writing

Written comments are considered with the same weight as verbal submissions at PDC. Comments can be provided either via email to application.info@mississauga.ca or letter sent to:

Mississauga City Council

Attention: Development Assistant

c/o Planning and Building Department – 6th Floor

300 City Centre Dr.

Mississauga, ON

L5B 3C1

·        Attend the Planning and Development Committee meeting

Anyone is welcome to attend and speak to matters on the agenda. PDC meetings are held in: 

Council Chamber

Mississauga Civic Centre

300 City Centre Dr.

Mississauga, ON

[Map]

·        Watch the live stream or videos on demand

PDC meetings are live streamed and available on demand via our website

·        Request notification of future meetings

By email: application.info@mississauga.ca

By letter:

Mississauga City Council

Attention: Development Assistant

c/o Planning and Building Department – 6th Floor

300 City Centre Dr.
Mississauga, ON
L5B 3C1

·        Sign up for email updates

Register online for alerts and notifications about upcoming meetings, agendas and media advisories. 

·        Follow the City on social media

Facebook and Twitter updates can help to keep you informed.

·        Follow your local Councillor online

Many Councillors create a monthly eNewsletter which can also keep you informed.

About Planning and Development Committee (PDC)

The City’s Planning and Development Committee (PDC) includes all members of Council. The committee’s main responsibility is to provide an opportunity for the public to express their views on planning-related policies and development applications. This forum for public participation serves to fulfill the requirements of The Planning Act

The committee also considers planning-related policies and conditions under which site specific development can occur. Recommendations made by the PDC are forwarded to Council for adoption. The committee generally meets every three weeks.

For more information on committee meetings, visit the City’s Clerks page or the Council and Committees calendar on the City’s website.