Category Archives: City of Mississauga

City of Mississauga Suggests Updates to the Public Tree By-law Tree

In a corporate report presented at General Committee today, staff from the City of Mississauga’s Forestry section provided an informational overview of the suggested updates to the City’s Public Tree By-law.

“Trees play a crucial role for cities like Mississauga by improving livability. They are essential for creating and maintaining a healthy community,” said Jodi Robillos, Director, Parks, Forestry and Environment. “Over the last few years, trees within the city have come under increased threat due to disease, invasive species, climate change and human-driven damage. Through the updated Public Tree By-law, the City continues to prioritize tree health and well-being because of the endless benefits they provide. The draft Public Tree By-law clearly outlines the Tree Protection and Preservation Standards that will guide the public, development community and City staff.”

The draft Public Tree By-law will protect more than 300,000 trees on City streets and parks and was developed in response to recommendations made in the City’s Future Directions Master Plan, Urban Forest Management Plan and Natural Heritage and Urban Forest Strategy. The revised draft by-law:

·         regulates the planting, maintenance and removal of trees on public property

·         provides greater clarity on by-law violations

·         references a public tree permit process 

·         allows the City to prosecute corporations or individuals who don’t adhere to the by-law.

“The City of Mississauga enacted its first Public Tree By-law in 1975 to regulate the planting, maintenance and protection of trees and shrubs on public lands. The existing Public Tree By-law is outdated and no longer meets current standards,” said Brent Reid, Manager, Forestry. “The updated standards lay out the City expectations relating to tree protection on all projects that involve City-owned trees including tree protection fencing, securities and replacement requirements.”

Updates and improvements to the protection of City trees include:

·   Prohibiting storage of material, equipment or anything that would impede the health of a tree’s root zone

·   Requiring approval for work within the tree protection zone as identified and approved by City staff and prohibiting grade changes in the tree protection zone

·   Prohibiting dangerous liquids, gaseous or solid substances to come into contact with the tree’s root system

·   Prohibiting the removal of any woody debris that has fallen or been cut down by the City in a natural area and left

·   Prohibiting planting of trees on public land. In the event trees are planted on public land, the by-law stipulates that the subject tree becomes public and subject to the terms of the draft by-law

The draft Public Tree By-law would also introduce new permit fees for work that may impact City-owned trees.

Both the City’s draft Public Tree By-law and the Private Tree By-law will undergo community consultation this summer. Stakeholders will be asked to provide feedback about the new updates for the Public Tree By-law and submit feedback about what they would like to see changed in the Private Tree By-law.

For more information about trees in Mississauga, visit mississauga.ca/services-and-programs/forestry-and-environment/

Learn More About Parking Regulations and How They Affect You

Mississauga is made up of different neighbourhoods. How people live, work, play and move can vary across these neighbourhoods. So it follows that parking requirements for new construction and new businesses should not be one-size-fits-all. Demographics and preferences have also changed over the years, as has the demand for private parking.

Parking plays an important role in city building. It can shape how buildings are designed, how residents move and the way businesses evolve. The City of Mississauga is updating its off-street parking regulations under its Zoning By-law. Off-street parking refers to the amount of vehicle or bicycle parking that is required on private and public properties as a result of new development, redevelopment or a land use change. It does not apply to existing buildings, homes, street parking or municipal parking lots. 

Parking is expensive to build and maintain. By updating the regulations for private parking, the City can support housing affordability, enhanced development and economic opportunities and offer more mobility options that can help lower carbon emissions.

The City has launched its Parking Regulation Study to provide an updated framework to support future parking regulations. On Monday, May 31 at 6 p.m., City staff will present a draft report to the Planning and Development Committee that provides background research, draft policy directions and proposed vehicle and bicycle off-street parking regulations.

Meeting participants will have the opportunity to ask questions and share their feedback about the proposed changes. Watch the live meeting while it’s in session by viewing the livestream.

Starting June 1, residents and business owners can also view our online on-demand community meeting and provide comments.

The Parking Regulations Study is a key action from the City’s recently-approved Parking Master Plan and Implementing Strategy (PMPIS). It is also implementing key actions from the Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Strategy, 2018 and bicycle parking requirements in the City’s Zoning By-law noted in the 2018 Cycling Master Plan.

For more information about the Parking Regulations Study, visit yoursay.mississauga.ca/parking-regulations-study, see the FAQs or contact us at parking.regs@mississauga.ca.

Culture Lives Here – Have Your Say on Creating Vibrant Cultural Districts within Mississauga

What cultural opportunities would you like to see in Mississauga? With a growing arts, culture and creative industry scene and unique neighbourhoods that are emerging as popular hubs of creativity and innovation, Mississauga is well-positioned to be an arts-friendly city. Many neighbourhoods in Mississauga are intensifying and we are witnessing a growing cluster of arts and culture facilities, and diverse entertainment, retail and dining options. The City will build on these existing assets and support the growth of these neighbourhoods as distinct Cultural Districts through new cultural infrastructure and unique programming.

Mississauga has identified six Cultural Districts, each with its own unique identity and community priorities, under its Cultural Districts Implementation Plan:

  • Clarkson 
  • Cooksville 
  • Downtown Core 
  • Malton 
  • Port Credit 
  • Streetsville 

Starting in May, you can complete an online survey to share your feedback on the Cultural Districts Implementation Plan and ideas for future activities in the Districts. Your input will help inform the development of arts and culture spaces and opportunities and help the City map out the first phase of implementation in the Districts. Many exciting things can happen in the Districts (e.g. public art, public space improvements, street festivals, pop-ups, performances, patios) and we want to hear from the community.

Benefits of Cultural Districts

Cultural Districts play an important role for the city. They offer residents and visitors alike a diversity of experiences within a distinct, concentrated mixed-use area. Cultural Districts help strengthen the local economy, create a sense of place and support community well-being, and deepen local cultural capacity. The six cultural districts will provide opportunities for the City to attract visitors, support local businesses, increase arts and culture and create vibrant neighbourhood hubs. Major benefits of Cultural Districts include: 

·         Creating opportunities for participating in arts and culture activities

·         Enhancing and beautifying public spaces and streets

·         Celebrating the unique local character and heritage of a neighbourhood

·         Providing new avenues for social interaction and community gathering

·         Encouraging and supporting economic development and business growth

·         Supporting the growth of creative industries and cultural production

·         Addressing needs of specific neighbourhoods

·         Boosting local tourism and the evening economy

·         Preserving and reusing historic infrastructure, buildings and landmarks

·         Connecting people to outdoor spaces (e.g. parks, open spaces)

In February 2021, Council approved the Implementation of Cultural Districts, which are a key recommendation within the Culture Master Plan.

To learn more about Mississauga’s six Cultural Districts and to fill out the online survey, visit yoursay.mississauga.ca/cultural-districts.

Have Your Say – Does Mississauga Need an Apartment Building Standards and Maintenance Program?

Mississauga has a number of property-related by-laws that detail the requirements for maintaining rental apartment buildings and other properties across the city. Staff are currently assessing the need for an Apartment Building Standards and Maintenance Program similar to the City of Toronto’s RentSafeTO program. 

The proposed program could include a proactive rental building inspection plan.

Anyone with an interest in rental apartment building standards and maintenance can share their experiences, thoughts and ideas by visiting the public engagement website atmississauga.ca/apartment-standards-and-maintenance to ask a question and take the online survey.

The input received will help determine the need for a standards and maintenance program for rental apartment buildings in Mississauga.

The online survey is available until July 31, 2021.

Get up to Speed on the Do’s and Don’ts of Operating your E-Scooter in Mississauga

As part of the City of Mississauga’s E-Scooter Pilot Program, Mississauga residents, visitors and commuters can use their e-scooters to get to their destinations. Before you get to scooting, make sure you’re up to speed on where you can and can’t operate your e-scooter in Mississauga, as well as the rules and etiquette to follow to keep yourself and other road users safe.

The City has implemented an e-scooter pilot to regulate the personally-owned e-scooters currently being operated in Mississauga. An e-scooter is a two-wheeled device that the rider operates while standing. The devices are battery-operated and equipped with a hand brake, lights, bell and kickstand. In Mississauga, e-scooters can be operated by those 16 years old and older, up to a speed of 24 km/h.

As part of the pilot, the City has updated its Parks By-LawTraffic By-Law and Transit By-Law to regulate where e-scooters can be operated in Mississauga. 

Continue reading Get up to Speed on the Do’s and Don’ts of Operating your E-Scooter in Mississauga