Category Archives: Development

Cities Must be Made Whole: City of Mississauga Responds to Devastating Financial Impacts of Bill 23

Today, at a Special Council Meeting, City staff provided an overview of Bill 23, the Build More Homes Faster Act, 2022 and its potential impacts on Mississauga. The Bill introduces changes, which, if approved, would significantly limit the City’s ability to provide important housing-related infrastructure and services resulting in increased costs for Mississauga residents.

“We want to work with the province to build more housing and while we agree that bold action needs to be taken, it can’t be done at the expense of our city and ultimately, our taxpayers. Cities can’t be expected to fund provincial incentives to help bring more affordability to the market. Right now, we have no guarantees from either level of government that cities will be made whole and that’s extremely concerning. If passed, this legislation puts our plans to build and maintain parks and open spaces, libraries, fire stations, sewers, roads and public transit that future and existing residents need and deserve on hold. Our Council works hard each day to deliver fairness for taxpayers and I encourage the government to find a solution that doesn’t put the gains we’ve made at risk.”

Mayor Crombie

According to the staff report, the City stands to lose over $800 million in revenue over the next 10 years. This includes more than $320 million for growth-related infrastructure and a staggering 70 per cent loss of revenues collected for the purchase of parkland. The shortfall stems from Bill 23’s proposed changes to development charges and parkland dedication.

“Building complete communities requires cooperation with the private sector and all levels of government,” said Shari Lichterman, Commissioner, Corporate Services and Chief Financial Officer. “Cities are facing significant financial impacts but there is no guarantee that developers will be required to pass any savings resulting from lower growth and parkland charges on to new homeowners. This must be addressed because as it stands, the quality of life in our communities will suffer at the expense of developer profits.”

In addition to the projected loss of revenue, the staff report highlights the impact Bill 23 could have on affordable housing. The legislation proposes to reduce or eliminate the few tools municipalities have to deliver affordable housing.  For example:

  • The proposed five per cent cap for inclusionary zoning (IZ) units will result in a minimum of 30 per cent fewer affordable units than the City anticipated when it passed its IZ policy earlier this year.
  • The shift to a market-based definition of affordability for IZ units would mean that the vast majority of Mississauga’s essential workforce would be priced out of these homes.
  • Rental protection laws would be removed or scaled back.

As part of the province’s overall 1.5 million new homes target, Mississauga must pledge to build 120,000 homes in the next ten years (approximately 12,000 units a year).

“We welcome growth in Mississauga and have a robust plan to build more housing, including allowing for unlimited height and density in our downtown and gentle density in our neighbourhoods. But, as we build more supply, we can’t forget about affordability,” said Andrew Whittemore, Commissioner, Planning and Building. “Given the depth of the affordability issues across Ontario, the Province must continue to protect rental housing and ensure that the supply of affordable housing continues to grow alongside market units.”

The City already has policies in place that will assist Mississauga in achieving the provincial targets, however, the staff report questions whether the development industry is prepared to bring those units to market given economic conditions, persistent labour and material challenges.

The staff report also outlines concerns echoed by many stakeholders around the potential impacts on Ontario’s heritage, natural environment and the ability to adapt to climate change. Of note for Mississauga is the new proposed “Ecological Offsetting” policy which would set a dangerous precedent by chipping away at the amount of natural spaces covered by the City’s Natural Heritage System.

Today’s report, which was endorsed by City Council, authorizes staff to submit detailed comments on Bill 23 to the Government of Ontario during the consultation period.

Guiding Future Growth: City to Present Lakeshore East Corridor Draft Recommendations

The draft recommendations of the Lakeshore East Corridor Study will be presented atPlanning and Development Committee (PDC) on Monday, November 15 as part of a public information meeting. The study examines urban design and policy directions to manage growth along the Lakeshore East Corridor. Public engagement has been an important part of the study. Feedback from area residents and stakeholders has been considered in the draft recommendations.

What: 

Public information meeting to review draft recommendations from the Lakeshore East Corridor Study.

When:

Planning and Development Committee

November 15, 2021 at 6 p.m.

Who:

·        Mississauga residents

·        Business and property owners

·        Members of Planning and Development Committee

·        City staff

How to Participate Virtually or In Person:

Advance registration is required to participate in person and/or make a comment in the virtual public meeting. Please email deputations.presentations@mississauga.ca no later than Friday, November 12, 2021 at 4 p.m. Any materials you wish to show the Committee during your presentation must be provided as an attachment to the email. Links to cloud services will not be accepted. You will be provided with directions on how to participate from Clerks’ staff.

How to Participate Via Telephone:

Residents without access to the internet, via computer, smartphone or tablet, can participate and/or make a comment in the meeting via telephone. To register, please call Megan Piercey at 905-615-3200 ext. 4915 no later than Friday, November 12, 2021 at 4 p.m. You must provide your first and last name, phone number, and application number if you wish to speak to the Committee. You will be provided with directions on how to participate from Clerks’ staff.

Background:

The goal of the Lakeshore East Corridor Study has been to review the planning policy framework that will guide future development along the corridor. Virtual public consultation sessions were held throughout 2021. More information about the study can be found here

The study covers the frontage properties along Lakeshore Road East between Seneca Avenue and Etobicoke Creek. The Lakeview Village Master Plan (former Ontario Power Generation site) is not part of this study. It is undergoing a separate planning application process.

Map of the Study Area

For more information, refer to the related City studies:

Mississauga Official Plan Review Meetings to Discuss Housing, Growth, Transportation and Environment

The City is hosting three virtual community meetings to discuss key directions of Mississauga’s Official Plan Review. Housing, growth, transportation and the environment will be the focus in this phase of public engagement.

Mississauga is reviewing its current Official Plan, which guides growth, to ensure it reflects the changing needs, opportunities and aspirations of the city. Since launching the Official Plan Review in June 2019, the City has conducted ongoing public consultation. Having reviewed the community feedback to date, this current phase of engagement focuses on confirming policy directions for environment, transportation and growth.  Engagement for housing options will explore ideas from the community.

What & When:

Virtual community meetings to discuss our future city:

·        What are the priorities for the environment and transportation?

Tuesday, June 15, 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.  

·        Where will major growth go?

Thursday, June 17, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

·        How can we increase housing choices in our neighbourhoods? 

Wednesday, June 23, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Who:

·        Mississauga residents and property owners

·        Business owners and employees

·        Members of Council and City staff

How:

To participate:

·        Register here or call 311. Registered participants will receive meeting instructions and background materials. If you are unable to attend, the meetings will be recorded and can be viewed following the sessions.

·        Provide feedback or ask a question on the project engagement site.

To prepare for the meetings:

·        Official Plan Review: Visit the project engagement site to review the research briefs, theme summaries and project engagement to date

·        Housing: Help shape the conversation by taking the survey and sharing your ideas.Visit the Increasing Housing Choices in Neighbourhoods for more information

·        Transportation: For more information, see related studies including Changing Lanes and the Transportation Master Plan

·        Environment: For more information, see related studies including the Climate Change Action Plan  

Background:

The City’s Official Plan policies address important parts of city-building that affect how the city grows, including transportation, housing, culture and heritage, the environment and the economy.

The Official Plan addresses:

  • where housing, industry, offices, shops and roads should go
  • which services and amenities (e.g., parks, schools, transit) are needed and where they will be located
  • what parts of the city will be the focus for growth and what it will look like e.g., heights and densities
  • ways to enhance economic development and job growth

The City launched the Official Plan Review at a Special Council meeting held on June 10, 2019. For more information and to sign up for email updates, visit the public engagement page.

Register for Upcoming Virtual Community Workshop – Lakeshore East Corridor Study

Register for one of the upcoming virtual community workshops as part of the Lakeshore East Corridor Study.

The Study, which was launched at a virtual community meeting on February 23, 2021, is reviewing the built form, height and density policies that guide future development along the Lakeshore East Corridor in the Lakeview area.

What:

These virtual community workshops will include:

  • Presentation by urban design expert Harold Madi, highlighting best practices for main street corridors and livability
  • City planning staff project update 
  • Small group discussions 
  • Opportunity for public feedback

When:

Workshops will be offered on Tuesday, May 4 and Wednesday, May 5 from 6:30 to 8 p.m.

The format and content will be the same for both meetings. Participants are welcome to register for the date that suits them best.

Who:

  • Mississauga residents
  • Business owners/property owners
  • Members of Council and City staff

How:

Register here to participate or call 311. 

Registered participants will receive meeting instructions and additional background materials.

Background:

The goal of the study is to review the planning policy framework that will guide future development along the corridor. More information about the study can be found here.

The study covers the frontage properties along Lakeshore Road East between Seneca Avenue and Etobicoke Creek. The Lakeview Village Master Plan (former Ontario Power Generation site) is not part of this study as it is going through a separate planning application process.

Map of the Study Area:

For more information, refer to the related city studies: