Category Archives: Marine

LAKE ONTARIO SHORELINE Flood Watch – Message #1

Lake Ontario model output for Burlington from the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry’s Surface Water Monitoring Centre is forecasting a storm surge of 1.34 metres above the International Great Lakes Datum (m LGLD) of 74.2 metres and maximum wave heights of 1.56 metres. Lake levels are expected to be in the range of 76.3 m IGLD.     

The 2017 lake flood damage threshold was established at a static lake elevation of 75.45 m IGLD when waves generated during a storm event overtopped and damaged several shoreline structures. This local damage threshold elevation does not account for wave generated by winds which can increase flood elevations and cause additional damages; this is especially true with onshore winds associated with storms. 

Watercourses discharging directly into Lake Ontario could be impacted by backwater from the lake.  Onshore waves could result in erosion and unstable banks.  Residents and visitors to the Lake Ontario shoreline areas should use extreme caution and obey all closure notices for trails and pathways.  As lake levels increase, certain areas may be cut off or isolated.

CVC will continue to monitor weather and lake conditions.  This Lake Ontario Shoreline Flood Watch will be in effect until Fri-May-22-2020 at 4 pm or updated prior to.  

For more information on this Lake Ontario Shoreline Flood Watch, contact CVC during office hours at 905- 670-1615. 

To view current watershed conditions, visit our real-time monitoring website:

http://www.creditvalleyca.ca/watershed-science/watershed-monitoring/real-time-monitoring/

City Refreshes Waterfront Parks Strategy

The City of Mississauga has refreshed its Waterfront Parks Strategy, outlining a 25-year vision for City parks along Mississauga’s 22 kilometres (km) of waterfront along Lake Ontario. The strategy promotes the protection and enhancement of the City’s waterfront while providing public access along the water’s edge and opportunities for recreation, tourism and economic development. The proposed infrastructure improvements will maintain and strengthen the City’s historical connection to Lake Ontario.

“For decades, a large part of Mississauga’s waterfront was a hub for heavy industry with limited access for the public. Over the years we’ve worked to build parks and create public spaces for everyone to enjoy. Our work is only just beginning. This 25-year strategy aims to further reclaim our waterfront and ensure it remains accessible to residents for generations to come,” said Mayor Bonnie Crombie. “People are drawn to the water and Mississauga is in the envious position of having 22 kilometres of shoreline. It’s important we not only protect this precious resource, but also promote it. We will do this by seamlessly connecting our existing and new parks with a continuous waterfront trail that connects to our neighbours, and ensuring that all future development prioritizes access to the water.”

The vision of the strategy is Life Thrives at the Water, which captures the spirit of how the waterfront influences the well-being of all the communities and ecosystem along the lake edge. The refresh builds on the 2008 strategy and addresses current planning trends and intensification along Mississauga’s waterfront. As well, the strategy supports the Cycling Master Plan by recommending the implementation of north/ south cycling connections to Lakeshore Road and beyond with paths linking to Toronto and Oakville, and the waterfront trail closer to the Lake Ontario shoreline.

Crombie added, “As a key commercial area for the City, Mississauga’s waterfront redevelopment will drive tourism, foster innovation, attract new business and boost economic growth. Our goal is to ensure our waterfront is a walkable, accessible, transit and cycling-friendly community where people can meet and connect and where businesses can prosper and thrive.”

Port Credit Harbour

The refreshed strategy builds upon the City’s successes along the waterfront and provides a planning framework to address:

·        Climate change

·        Intensification and brownfield development along the waterfront

·        The desire to create an enlivened water’s edge with increased public access and water-based recreation (e.g. boating, paddling, fishing and swimming)

·        Increased use of the waterfront by a diverse population in balance with natural heritage goals

·        Tourism in balance with local community needs

“The strategy provides a comprehensive plan to preserve, protect and enhance the waterfront park system for present and future generations,” said Jodi Robillos, Director, Parks, Forestry and Environment. “Each waterfront park has its own character and provides a unique waterfront experience that includes different views of the lake, trail use, nature and heritage appreciation as well as special programs.”

The most significant changes for the 2019 refresh include new parkland, as well as a new large naturalized landscape created as part of the Jim Tovey Lakeview Conservation Area.

Robillos added, “The implementation and funding of initiatives for the strategy will be subject to approval through the annual budget and business planning process.”

The City’s Refreshed Waterfront Parks Strategy Plan is set to go to Council for final approval on February 5. For more information about the project, visit mississauga.ca/portal/residents/parks-waterfront-parks-strategy.

LAKE ONTARIO HAZARD WATCH

A Gale (Wind) Warning is in effect as posted by Environment Canada for Western Lake Ontario Marine Forecast.  Winds east 35 knots (65 km/hr) diminishing to east 25 (45) this eveningthen backing to northeast 25 late overnight. Wind diminishing to north 15 (28) Monday afternoon. Waves 3 metres subsiding to 2 near midnight and to one near noon Monday.

A new DAILY peak for Lake Ontario was set at 75.92 metres above International Great Lakes Datum (m IGLD) on Jun-06-2019. Flood damages in 2017 occurred at a threshold elevation of 75.45 m when waves generated during a storm event overtopped and damaged several shoreline structures.  The local damage threshold elevation does not account for wave generated by winds which can increase flood elevations and cause additional damages; this is especially true with onshore winds associated with storms. The current combination of the storm surge and wave heights could approach or exceed 76 m IGLD. 

Watercourses discharging directly into Lake Ontario may be impacted by backwater from the lake.  Residents and visitors to the Lake Ontario shoreline areas should use extreme caution and obey all closure notices for trails and pathways.  As lake levels increase, certain areas may be cut off or isolated.

CVC will continue to monitor weather and lake conditions.  This Lake Ontario Shoreline Hazard Watch will be in effect until Mon-Dec-02-2019 at 4 pm or updated prior to.  

For more information on this Lake Ontario Hazard Watch, contact CVC during office hours at 905- 670-1615