Category Archives: Traffic

City of Mississauga Moves Forward with Residential Road Safety Initiatives

Today, City Council received an update on Mississauga’s Automated Speed Enforcement (ASE) program, an automated system that uses a camera and a speed measurement device to detect and capture images of vehicles travelling in excess of the posted speed limits. Council also approved several recommendations in the corporate report about speed management initiatives. Together, these projects will implement several safety actions in the Transportation Master Plan and advance the City’s commitment to Vision Zero.

“We continue to take action to make our roads safer for everyone. Mississauga is taking a thoughtful and planned approach to implementing Automated Speed Enforcement in Mississauga to ensure it is aligned with new provincial regulations and effective for years to come,” said Mayor Bonnie Crombie. Our goal is to keep our City safe and have zero deaths on our roads to achieve Vision Zero. To do this, we need to continue to lower speed limits in our neighbourhoods and implement speed reduction initiatives to create safer communities for our families to walk, cycle and play in. Given the recent rash of deadly speed-related accidents on roads across the GTA, we will be exploring how we can fast-track the implementation of ASE on major arterial roads.”

In addition to the ASE update, Council also received an update on the Neighbourhood Area Speed Limit Project. Before beginning the ASE program, a number of speed limit initiatives within the Neighbourhood Area Speed Limit Project need to be completed. This includes lowering speed limits to 30 km/h in neighbourhood school zones, implementing school area community safety zones, and lowering speed limits on residential streets to 40 km/h. The next step is to identify and implement these zones.

“We have heard repeatedly through the City’s Road Safety Committee that residents want lower speed limits in their neighbourhoods,” said Ward 9 Councillor Pat Saito and Chair of the Road Safety Committee. “A key piece to reducing speeds in our neighbourhoods is to first lower the speed limits followed by implementing Automated Speed Enforcement. This combined effort will be an important step forward in advancing Vision Zero in Mississauga.”

The report highlights the steps and processes required to implement ASE:

·         Establish a Task Force to create court capacity for ASE

·         Delay Phase 1 of ASE until January 2021 to allow necessary lowered school zone speed limits and community safety zones to be identified and signage installed

·         Authorize staff to enter into agreements with the ASE vendor Redflex Traffic Systems (Canada) Limited, the City of Toronto Joint Processing Centre and the Ministry of Transportation 

·         Establish the City’s preferred method for dealing with ASE charges – issuing tickets under the Provincial Offences Act (POA) or through the Administrative Penalty System (APS) – a system of administering penalties used by a municipality to regulate by-laws

Once the above agreements are reached, the City can begin the ASE program six months later.

“The City has identified speeding as a problem on its roads and Council’s support of the implementation of these important speed initiatives will deliver on the actions in our Transportation Master Plan,” said Andy Harvey, Director, Traffic Management and Municipal Parking. “It is unfortunate that the COVID-19 pandemic has delayed the implementation of both our Neighbourhood Area Speed Limit Project and ASE. However, we are continuing to position the City to deliver ASE in an efficient, yet co-ordinated effort.”

Harvey added that provincial-wide closures including the court system, due to the coronavirus pandemic, has impacted the delivery of Mississauga’s ASE program.

For more information on ASE, visit aseontario.com.

Background

The Ontario Government amended Bill 65 – the Safer School Zones Act in 2017. This Act amended the Highway Traffic Act to introduce the use of ASE in school zones and community safety zones across the province. Ontario municipalities worked jointly with the Ontario Traffic Council to plan the implementation of ASE. In October 2019, Mississauga City Council approved amendments to the Traffic By-Law that will gradually lower speeds on residential streets from 50 to 40 km/h. To-date, 11 neighbourhoods have received 40 km/h signage at the entry and exit points.

Mississauga Ready for Investing in Canada Infrastructure Program

Today, Mississauga’s General Committee identified and approved the projects the City will submit for consideration under the Government of Canada’s Investing in Canada Infrastructure Program (ICIP). According to the funding criteria outlined by the Government of Canada, the ICIP is a ten-year federal infrastructure program designed to create long-term economic growth, build inclusive, sustainable and resilient communities and support a low-carbon economy. 

The federal government is providing $33 billion through the ICIP to cost-share projects under four streams: 1. Public Transit; 2. Community, Culture and Recreation; 3. Green Infrastructure and 4. Rural and Northern Communities. The City of Mississauga is not eligible for the fourth stream.

“Infrastructure funding investments are important and help us build strong, vibrant communities. This funding will allow us to build a transit and transportation system that is convenient, connected, and reliable for those who live and work here. We’ve heard from residents about their priorities and we are in a strong position to put forward projects that we are confident will be approved by the federal and provincial governments. This will be the largest investment we’ve made in public transit to date with an $847.5 million total cost for the projects we’re putting forward. These projects include Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) lanes along our Lakeshore and Dundas corridors, as well as the purchase of 409 new hybrid-electric buses to green our transit fleet and help us hit our GHG reduction targets. In addition, we will be applying for almost $133 million for community and recreational infrastructure projects such as the rehabilitation of the Public Marina and Waterfront Park development, and the South Common Community Centre and Library. We’ve been working hard to ensure Mississauga is at the table with both the federal and provincial governments and that they are aware and understand our priorities and most importantly, why Mississauga matters.”

Mayor Bonnie Crombie

Under the Public Transit stream, a total of $339 million in federal funding and $282.5 million in provincial funding has been allocated to the City of Mississauga over the next 10 years. The primary focus is for new transit projects and active transportation infrastructure directly connected to the public transit system.

The Community, Culture and Recreation stream is different as it is application based with no guarantee that projects will be approved. The program will provide approximately $407 million in federal funding and $320 million in provincial funding to support projects across Ontario that improve access to and quality of community, cultural and recreation infrastructure.

“We are able to respond quickly and put forward a list of projects for Council’s consideration as result of our deliberate, consistent and detailed capital budget planning,” said Janice Baker, City Manager and Chief Administrative Officer. “For transit in particular, this funding program is helping to provide the predictable and sustainable infrastructure funding needed to grow, maintain and improve our current transit systems. Projects for both streams were selected based on the program criteria and knowing they could not begin until after ICIP approval is received and that they must be substantially complete by March 2027.”

List of proposed City projects:

ICIP – Public Transit Stream ProjectsTotal Cost
Bus replacement program$359.7 M
Dundas BRT lanes – Confederation to Etobicoke$305.7M
Lakeshore BRT lanes – Deta Rd. to East Ave.$54.6M
Express Corridors$49.5M
Bus Maintenance/Rehab$44.1M
Presto$10M
CAD/AVL/HASTUS$9M
Cycle Tracks$4M
Bus Shelters$3.8M
Farebox Refurbishment$2M
Bus Terminals$1.6M
Bus stops/pads$1M
Enhanced Partitions$0.7M
Mini Terminals/Bays$0.7M
MiWay Signs$0.7M
Transit Vehicles (non-buses)$0.4M
Revenue Equipment Replacement$0.1M
Total Cost$847.5M
  
ICIP – Community, Culture and Recreation Stream Projects 
South Common Community Centre and Library$61.6M
Public Marina and Waterfront Park$71.3M
Total Cost$132.9M

Council previously approved the projects for the Public Transit stream and the City submitted the required initial documents as per the October 24, 2019 deadline. The proposed projects for the Community, Culture and Recreation stream will be going forward to Council on November 6 for final approval and will be submitted by the deadline of November 12, 2019.

Mississauga’s Proposed Parking Master Plan Now Available for Public Comment

The City of Mississauga’s proposed Parking Master Plan, “Parking Matters” is now available for public comment. 

The master plan details how community parking will evolve as the City continues to grow and transform. The plan’s content reflects the input received during extensive public and stakeholder consultation staff conducted over the past two years.

“The Parking Master Plan and Implementation Strategy looks at all aspects of parking in Mississauga,” said Andy Harvey, Director, Traffic Management and Municipal Parking. “Parkingpolicy, planning, funding and emerging technologies were studied to develop an approach to parking that is made for Mississauga.The Parking Master Plan will help improve efficiency, manage parking in the future and better align public and private parking with transportation and economic development goals across the City.” 

The master plan provides short and long-term recommendations focused on 10 themes. These include Municipal Parking Provisions and Management, Funding and Finance, Safety and Accessibility and Technology and Innovation.

Visit the Parking Matters website to provide comments. All input received by May 31 will be considered. 

The master plan will go to General Committee for approval on June 12.

Learn more about Parking Matters in Mississauga.