Select City Services Set to Reopen on September 8

As part of the City’s phased and controlled reopening plans, some limited City services will be available in-person, by appointment only beginning September 8:

·        Marriage licenses – Book appointment online here. Service provided at Civic Centre (300 City Centre Dr.). 

·        Mobile licensing – Book appointment online here. Service provided at Mavis North Yard (3235 Mavis Rd.).

·        Business licensing – Book appointment online here. Service provided at Civic Centre (300 City Centre Dr.).

In addition, the Council Chamber and Committee Rooms will reopen for meetings at the Civic Centre (300 City Centre Dr.) with reduced capacity.

“Mississauga has come a long way, working together as a community, to stop the spread of COVID-19,” said Mayor Bonnie Crombie. “We know how much our residents and businesses want to get life back to normal, but we must remain vigilant. Working alongside our public health experts, we are now in a position to gradually and safely reopen some of our counter services along with modified community programming. Thank you to everyone for continuing to do your part to stay safe and healthy. Please, wear a face covering, wash your hands, maintain physical distancing, stay home if you are feeling ill and get tested if needed.”  

Health and safety protocols are in place to protect staff and the public at all City facilities. These protocols include:

·        Active screening – Staff and visitors are screened with COVID-19 assessment questions before entering a City facility.

·        Limited building access – Doors have been designated for entry and exit.

·        Mandatory masks – Face coverings are required in all indoor public spaces.

·        Physical distancing – Signage and floor markings indicate how to maintain two metres or six feet of space between others.

·        Signage – Floor decals and signage provide direction, health and safety reminders and ensure physical distancing.

·        Limited elevator capacity – Signage indicates safe and reduced capacity of elevators.

·        Stairwells – Where possible, stairwells are designated for up or down traffic.

·        Enhanced cleaning protocols – New protocols include increased cleaning and disinfecting of highly-touched surfaces and high traffic areas. 

“The health and safety of our staff and the public continue to be our number one priority,” said Paul Mitcham, City Manager and Chief Administrative Officer (CAO). “We have and will continue to work closely with Peel Public Health and adhere to all guidelines and regulations put out by the Government of Ontario and the Region of Peel. These limited in-person service offerings as well as modified programming at our Recreation, Library and Culture facilities form the next step in our safe and gradual reopening and recovery plans. Other city services, including development applications and building permit applications, property tax payments and more continue to be accepted online.”

Additional program and service updates:

Recreation

Beginning September 8, community centres, fitness centres, indoor pools and limited arenas will reopen with modified programs/services.

Starting September 14, C Banquets (on the 12th floor of Civic Centre) and the BraeBen Golf Course dining room will be available for bookings.

Library 

All locations except Frank McKechnie (currently under renovation) will reopen on September 15 with limited service. Curbside service will continue to be offered at Frank McKechnie until the renovations are completed in mid-October. Visits are limited to one hour and services including computer access and limited study require an appointment.

Culture 

Starting September 8, bookings of some spaces will reopen including the Living Arts Centre RBC Theatre, studio rentals, church and group bookings. In addition, the information desk, reception and box office will reopen. 

Mississauga’s COVID-19 Recovery Framework guides the City’s reopening and recovery. The Framework is supported by four individual recovery plans – Community,EconomicFinance and Corporate – which set Mississauga’s path forward in a safe, efficient and inclusive way.  

Visit mississauga.ca/recovery or call 311 for more information.

One More Chance to Have Your Say on Noise in Mississauga

When should certain types of noise be permitted in Mississauga? How much noise is acceptable in a growing urban centre? As the City moves ahead in updating its Noise Control By-law, a new online survey is now available to get residents’ thoughts on how to manage noise now and for the future.

Your input will help shape the new by-law to ensure it is more responsive to resident and community needs.

We invite residents to share their thoughts and complete the survey by September 30, 2020.

To complete the survey, visit mississauga.ca/noise-control

City Rolls Out First Quiet Street in Mississauga

Today, the City launched its first Quiet Street in Ward 1 at St. Lawrence Dr. near Port Street East. in Port Credit. Quiet Streets are intended to encourage slow traffic and limit vehicle volume to local traffic only. They are temporary, short-term installations to provide more space for cyclists, walkers and runners to safely and comfortably use the road while being able to physical distance.

Along with Quiet Streets and lower neighbourhood speed limits, the City has also launched 17.9 km of new separated and on-road bike lanes that will be installed by the end of the year. Several key City strategic initiatives support the rapid expansion of the cycling network in Mississauga, including the Cycling Master Plan, the Climate Change Action Plan, and the Transportation Master Plan. The Mississauga Cycling Advisory Committee was also consulted in the development of the framework.

Quiet Streets were recommended as part of the COVID-19 Active Transportation Recovery Framework. Installations involve temporary barricades and signs to indicate to drivers that their travel path has been altered, along with warning to take extra care if they live in the area and are navigating the road. The barricades will allow for easy movement of essential emergency service vehicles as well as waste and road maintenance vehicles. Specific layouts will vary somewhat depending on characteristics such as road width and parking usage on each roadway.

Mayor Bonnie Crombie and Ward 1 Councillor Stephen Dasko launch the City’s first Quiet Street in Ward 1

The City will roll out eight Quiet Street sites over the next week with the potential for a total of 22 locations by the end of the month. Quiet Streets will not be implemented on multi-lane major collector or arterial roadways or with roads that have MiWay routes. Quiet Streets will be in place until October 15, 2020 in order to allow time to prepare for the winter season and for winter maintenance machinery such as snow plows.

Work has also begun on the Neighbourhood Area Speed Limit Project, which includes lowering speed limits to 30 km/h in neighbourhood school zones, implementing school area community safety zones and lowering speed limits on residential streets to 40 km/h.

Learn more about how the City is keeping pedestrians and cyclists moving safely in Mississauga, through the Active Transportation COVID-19 Recovery Framework report,approved by Council in July 2020. To stay up-to-date on COVID-19 impacts on City services, visit mississauga.ca/recovery and follow the City on Twitter @citymississauga.

Be Safe, Be Seen, Be Courteous: Brush Up on Mississauga’s Trail Etiquette

Every summer, Mississauga residents pull out their running shoes, pump up their bike tires, grab their pets and family members and head to the City’s trails and pathways. As Mississauga continues to recover from the COVID-19 pandemic, its trails are seeing even more traffic than normal, with residents looking to get outdoors and get some exercise while practising physical distancing.

The City’s network of shared pathways and trails is expansive, contains many hidden gems and provides pedestrians and cyclists alike with opportunities to visit Mississauga landmarks and see more of their city.

Whether you’re just starting to discover Mississauga’s network of shared pathways and multi-use trails, or have been using this network for years, make sure to brush up on trail etiquette before you head out.

Shared Pathway Trail Etiquette

Stay Right

  • Always keep to the right of the trail, particularly if you are traveling at a slower speed.

Pass Safely

  • Always pass others on their left.
  • Cyclists must use their bell or give a friendly, verbal warning before passing another cyclist or pedestrian.
  • Cyclists should keep their speed low when passing pedestrians.

Keep Your Distance

  • Respect the space of others. Maintain at least two metres, or one bike length, between yourself and those not in your household or social bubble.
  • Be extra cautious when cycling around older adults, children and pets.

Be Aware of Others

  • When approaching a sharp turn on your bike that obstructs your view, approach slowly, use your bell or give a verbal warning and proceed when clear to do so.
  • Don’t block the trail. If stopping for a break, pull off to the side or off of the trail completely, allowing trail traffic to continue safely.
  • Make sure that you can hear what’s going on around you, especially while you’re listening to music, talking or texting on your phone, or chatting with your walking buddy.
  • Keep your dog on-leash and make sure they are well-behaved at all times.

Be Seen and Be Safe

  • Make sure your bike has a light and reflectors that can be seen by others.
  • Wear a bike helmet. In an accident, helmets greatly reduce the risk of injury or even death. While it is required for anyone under the age of 18 to wear a helmet while riding their bike, it is strongly recommended that everyone riding their bike wear a helmet.

For more tips on cycling safety, visit mississaugabikes.ca.

To learn more about how the City is addressing the need for more active transportation options during COVID-19 recovery and beyond, check out the City’s Active Transportation COVID-19 Recovery Framework.